To Chromagnon or not to Chromagnon?

I have a Chromagnon on order from 1-1-20, #47 pre-order. I have a nice selection of LZX modules. I am starting to run out of rack space. Is there anything the Chormagnon does that can not be done with current and past LZX modules (excluding Vidiot and and Visual Cortex)?

I think there’s a long list of things Chromagnon can do that can’t be accomplished with a reasonable number of modules. For starters, it’s a full-blown scan processor a la the Rutt-Etra synth, complete with built-in automation.

Chromagnon marks a whole new epoch in video synths. Details are scarce, but from a look at the front panel it’s a modulation powerhouse. I doubt anyone will be disappointed.

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Since rack space was mentioned, it’s worth noting that Chromagnon comes in it’s own enclosure, so you don’t have to rack it if you don’t want.

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hey there, yea think it’s best just to hold onto yr preorder. the form factor alone, in it’s own case is gonna mean you’re more likely to take it, as opposed to a larger system, to gigs and such…

so many methods of synthesis, and yea, the rutt-etra is a huge selling point for me. no more fumbling and repatching each time you just want the one look.

Totally new to this! I have a Chromagnon on pre-order and have no clue whatsoever, I mean not at all. Would I need anything else or is this in it’s own a fully capable box? I wanna do live performances with my Eurorack setup and need video synthesis.

Chromagnon is a completely stand-alone instrument, with a video decoder and video encoder. It also has LZX modular video inputs and outputs for integration with other LZX or Eurorack gear.

It comes with a case, or it can be mounted on Eurorack rails.

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If you already have a eurorack setup, then you can use some of the modules that you already have. For example, the signals output by audio frequency oscillators will appear as scrolling white lines. You can use these signals to modulate and animate the Chromagnon. Envelopes are great modulators as well. To that, you might want to consider buying a dedicated scaler that converts 0-5v signals, to the LZX standard of 0-1v. Scopic Modular sells a 2hp scaler that is great. Others are available in 4hp.

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Got you! I just saw once a YT video of Visual Cortex (https://youtu.be/F7atk9IzQlQ?si=Jbssi7mqDXgSk1jZ) and I am wondering if Chromagnon can do as well the chroma keying (not sure if that’s the correct term). I am mainly interested in manipulating recorded video in that manner so that I can send it to 4 or 5 projectors or screens in a performance (4 or 5 different videos if possible). Would the Chromagnon give me these capabilities of the VC and the multiple projections? The focus is on syncing the music with the manipulations of the videos in a live setting and interactively.

Chromagnon will have quite a few ways of processing pre-recorded video (& live video, for that matter), however it won’t be able to feed 4-5 projectors with different videos, but neither would a Visual Cortex

Visual cortex had 4 video outputs which could run simultaneously - 1 component, 2 composite and 1 s-video

Chromagnon only has 2 - 1 composite and 1 component

But they are both effectively mono devices in that all outputs are the same…

in order to process more videos and output different videos you would need to buy additional modules - either multiple chromagnons or, for example, TBC 2s and ESG3s (or visual cortexes) plus processing modules (depending on the processing you want to do)

you could also take copies of a single composite output and process them through things like the syntonie cvb1 or cvb2 and/or video mixers to send to different projectors

it’s generally much easier to use audio to modulate video, than it is to use video to modulate audio, although it is possible… it really depends on how the audio is being created…

vh.s have an audio to modulation module (effectively a frequency splitter with an envelope follower per frequency band) which can be used to modulate any control voltage (cv) input

if the audio is being created by a modular synthesizer then the same cv that is being used to create the audio (& the audio itself) can be scaled down to modulate the inputs of video modules

nonlinearcircuits make a video to cv eurorack module (may be diy only, not sure if they’ve started making modules again) but I think it’s really intended to take a phone placed on top of it…

hope this helps!

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Thank you so much for these details! That helps a lot! Independently of the fact that both have mono outputs and that it is basically one output (1 video) would the VC or the Chromagnon the more powerful choice for my purpose? Thank you!

Does 4 different video outputs for the VC refer to four different videos? Sorry, I am confused. :crazy_face:

The Visual Cortex outputs the same signal 4 different ways - 1x component, 1x s-video, 2x composite - simultaneously.

Chromagnon is the better choice. It can handle HD. Visual Cortex only runs in NTSC or PAL timings (standard definition). Additionally, Visual Cortex is out of production, so it’s going to be harder to source one.

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Thanks for the clarification! Chromagnon it is!

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If you aren’t opposed to using a computer in your live rig, that would be the best way (IMO) to get different sections of your video composition to multiple projectors. Using software like Resolume Arena or TouchDesigner, a video capture card or dongles, and output hardware like a DataPath FX4 or Matrox QuadHead2Go or generic “video wall controller”… You can process the single feed from Chromagnon and split it up across the different projectors however you want. Plus you can easily blend in a webcam or whatever other video sources and add audio reactive and/or MIDI controllable effects and feedback loops in the software. Good luck either way!

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That’s what I was trying to avoid. On the other hand, I will definitely give it a thought, if that’s what it is needed for the desired outcome. Maybe I could somehow split the output from Chromagnon and route it to multiple projectors.

The device often used for splitting a single video signal to multiple inputs is called a video distribution amplifier. They are readily available online.

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