Community Powered Educational Collaborative Effort, or Dan B. called me a Vidiot! (brag)

vidiot
patch-tutorial

#1

Hey guys! We have recently been exploring the surface level nooks and crannies of video synthesis. As numerous members have lamented the lack of educational resources, we have considered our approach to learning ourselves as an opportunity to generate some content. As it turns out, even the simplest of concepts can get lost in translation.

Cue brag: here’s a screenshot of Dan B. calling us Vidiot’s while telling us to RTFM to find a switch on his instrument that isn’t so named in the manual! (As we all know Dan B means the loop switch, and made a simple mistake thinking it was referred to as a termination switch in the manual.)

Clearly we could all use some encouragement to make more mistakes in search of a better understanding of video synthesis! And what better an opportunity to compile some sort of knowledge base within the community.

Much like Dan B would appreciate us ‘actually knowing his synthesizer better,’ we would appreciate Dan B and the community joining us on the neverending journey to have fun and learn lots! Lars has made numerous comments on many platforms about the need and interest in tutorial making, perhaps LZX could support this effort for the embetterment of all LZX users in this infinity and beyond.

Happy New Year!


#2

Thank you so much for making this video. It’s incredibly appreciated that you took the time to make some content that adds value to Vidiot owners while we struggle to catch up with the backlog here in the workshop. We’re working on ways to stay late to do some live stream content soon, but we’ve felt like our hands are tied with regards to production time and resources for proper demo videos while we still have open orders to fill.

We don’t agree with Dan’s comment and it is against the spirit in which we try to foster community growth and participation here at LZX. I’ll have a talk with him about it. I’m glad you can take it with a sense of good humor. :slight_smile:


#3

We have the time, resources, and generally speaking enough of an established professional background in other spaces to be considered an asset in regard to educational content production. We would be more than happy to create, receive feedback in regards to, and expand upon any educational efforts you are interested in. We agree with your assessment in regards to the truly powerful implications of the Orion series release, and are interested in exploring as much of the informational minutia available for your products.

Do think about how we can best support your incremental effort to reestablish and better continue the analog video synthesis community of previous generations, most obviously by continuing to make videos like this, ~potentially at your guidance.~

/me hits the lights.
/me cues the music.
Etc.


#4

I apologize for the tone of my reply but in my defense I got upset because I felt you were giving users advice that could have caused them problems. I appreciate the effort you’ve put into making the video, and I would love to help you with any questions you may have if you decide to make more videos.

  • Dan B

#5

BTW: my son and I will be making Vidiot instructional videos soon that will be posted on our “thelonevidiot” YouTube channel


#6

Dan B! Thanks for chiming in! No need for apologies, we are totally stoked to be pushing the conversation forward. You might consider answering the following questions for the sake of starting a sort of ‘creator inspired’ FAQ for generations of Vidiots to come! (Feel free to answer or not answer to any extent you feel is appropriate.)


  • When you designed the Vidiot, what specific design problem were you addressing?

  • In your opinion, what innovation makes the Vidiot stand out in the modern era of video instruments?

  • How would you explain the utility of feedback and its context in regards to the Vidiot?

  • If the Vidiot were to be considered in a standalone signal chain, what conceptual guidelines would you give to future Vidiots in regards to exploring the instrument?

  • How would you personally situate the Vidiot within a larger video synthesis context or signal chain?

  • Are there any other components you would have added to the Vidiot in an ideal world?

  • In the future, how would you like to see the Vidiot used and expanded upon?


Anyways, glad we could chat more.
And Godspeed Dan B!
Save us from our Vidiocy.
In LZX we trust.


#7

I answered everything I could:
In your opinion, what innovation makes the Vidiot stand out in the modern era of video instruments?
The luminance processor. It enables the artist to control the parameters of his feedback with control voltages, and set up a feedback loop independent of the colorizer and other functions. This is one of the key features that makes Vidiot unique. Other features include the range of devices contained in Vidiot, and the modulation selector switches (reduce the need for patch cables, which can be cumbersome during a live performance)

How would you explain the utility of feedback and it’s context in regards to the Vidiot?
Vidiot was designed with the emphasis on feedback, because feedback has pretty much unlimited possibilities when it comes to generating beautiful, complex and interactive video patterns.

If the Vidiot were to be considered in a standalone signal chain, what conceptual guidelines would you give to future Vidiots in regards to exploring the instrument?
Plug in a camcorder and a couple of monitors and have fun!

Are there any other components you would have added to the Vidiot in an ideal world?
Yes, of course. But as the last manager I had once said “if it were up to the engineer nothing would ever get released”. We’ve put everything we could into this model. But there’s no reason this Vidiot couldn’t be the first in a series…


#8

You the man! Thanks Dan B!